The Carousel Painter

Book title: The Carousel Painter

Author: Judith Miller

Starting age:  14

Summary:

Carrington Brouwer finds herself in Ohio at her rich friend’s home after her father’s death. She is in need of a job, but lacks the skills to become a lady’s maid or seamstress – two of the few jobs that single women are allowed to do.

If only she could get a job where she could do what she does best – paint. When Carrington finds out that a painter is needed at her friend’s father’s carousel factory, she enlists the help of an unlikely ally to secure the job.The Carousel Painter

But the men aren’t one bit happy about having to work with a woman, and Carrington finds herself despised by all. Worse than that, she doesn’t even get to paint!

But Carrington finds that her problems are just beginning when her friend’s suitor makes unwelcome advances on her, and when she is targeted for a crime she didn’t even commit.

Can Carrington convince the police that she didn’t commit the crime? And what about her growing feelings for the grumpy manager at the factory? Will Carrington turn from her pride and to God before her whole world spirals out of control?

Pros:

The study of God’s Word is encouraged, faith is grown, and the lesson is learned that trusting in God is the best thing to do, even in the hardest of circumstances.

Cons:

A few parts of the book are a bit confusing if you don’t read through it slowly.

Enjoyable rating:

4 out of 5

Musings:

old bookold bookold bookold bookold book

My thoughts:

What makes this book unique is that it is written in first person. The way that Judith Miller paints Brouwer’s emotions and feelings is stupendous, and the first person POV makes it all the better. Miller did an excellent job writing The Carousel Painter, and with the attention capturing POV, I found myself quickly entranced by the book.

Life is better with your nose in a book.

The Door Within

Book title: The Door Within (The Door Within Trilogy #1)

Author: Wayne Thomas Batson

Starting age: 13

Summary:

Aidan Thomas is disgusted with how his life is going. He’s had to move across away from his best (and only) friend, he knows no one in town, and he’s saddled with his wheelchair-bound grandfather. And the nightmares he’s having aren’t adding anything pleasant to the situation either.The Door Within

But when scrolls suddenly appear, Aidan can’t help but read them. Scoffed by his parents, he keeps quiet, but the scrolls are ever present in his mind.

Aidan takes a step of faith and enters into a world he never knew existed – a world on the brink of war.

Pros:

Aidan learns respect for his grandfather, and finds that even a fraidy-cat teenager like him can be used by the King for the greatest of purposes.

Cons:

Aidan is disrespectful about his grandfather.

Enjoyable rating:

4 out of 5

Musings:

old bookold bookold bookold bookold book

My thoughts:

The Door Within is an attention grabber. I devoured this book and reluctantly allowed it to leave my hands so that my dad could read it. This book will keep you up all night finishing it.

Batson has crafted this book so that when you’re done reading it, you can barely contain your curiosity as to what happens next. The Door Within is a book that, no matter how many times you read it, will never get old.

 

After I read a good book, I have a hard time coping with reality. ~ Unknown

 

 

The Book of the King

Book title: The Book of the King (The Wormling Series #1)

Authors: Jerry B. Jenkins and Chris Fabry

Starting age: 13

Summary:

Owen Reeder has never been anything special. How could he when he is ultra-shy, totally geeky, and limps when he walks? The only friends Owen has are those within the covers of books. Well, and an annoying little girl Owen has nicknamed “Constant.”

When a mysterious man comes into Owen’s father’s bookstore and offers Owen a book unlike any he has ever seen, Owen is ready to snatch it up. And Book of the Kinghe would have if his father hadn’t chased the mystery man out of the building.

But what Owen doesn’t realize is that when he opens the book, his whole life will forever be changed. Owen finds himself an integral part in an epic adventure to battle evil and help good prevail.

Pros:

Sacrifices are made, hope is uncovered, and a new life is restored.

Cons:

Owen thinks to much about a girl (there are no inappropriate thoughts).

Enjoyable rating:

4 out of 5

Musings:

old bookold bookold bookold bookold book

My thoughts:

Written in a mixture of second and third person, The Book of the King makes for an interesting read.

When Owen first discovers hints that all is not as it appears, Jenkins and Fabry do an excellent job of playing up the emotion. When Owen is frightened and confused, you will feel those same emotions coursing over you. When he is fighting for his life, you feel as if you are there with him, also fighting for yours.

All in all, this book is an attention grabber, and you will find it a battle to turn your thoughts away from this excellently crafted novel.

If one cannot enjoy reading a book over and over again, there is no use in reading it at all. ~ Oscar Wilde

 

Coming Through the Rye

Book title: Coming Through the Rye

Author: Grace Livingston Hill

Starting age: 13

Summary:

Romayne Ransom adores her father and brother, so when she returns home from a cancelled party, she is in shock to find an elite police force headed by Evan Sherwood there lying in wait to arrest her family members.the Rye

When her father and brother arrive and her father is attacked by a horrific stroke, Romayne finds that the only one she can lean on is God.

Evan Sherwood pities the pretty, young Miss Ransom, but all his offers to help her are turned down. Smarting from being snubbed, Evan secretly assists Romayne. But a bullet nearly ends his career – and life.

Romayne heads to her new job, but it’s not long before an enemy comes to make good on a threat. Can Evan rescue Romayne in time?

Pros:

Family loyalty, faith in God, perseverance, and compassion all shine through brightly.

Cons:

Some people are described as drunk.

Enjoyable rating:

5 out of 5

Musings:

old bookold bookold bookold bookold book

My thoughts:

Coming Through the Rye is one of my favorite Grace Livingston Hill books. This was actually the first book I had read of hers. By the third page, I was hooked.

What really pulled me into this book is Roymane’s loyalty to her father. Although he is a criminal, she lovingly nurses him until his death.

Evan also deserves some accolades for his compassion, gentleness, and his work in striving to keep his beloved city safe.

 

Read the best books first, or you may not have a chance to read them all. ~ Thoreau

 

 

The Captive Maiden

Book title: The Captive Maiden

Author: Melanie Dickerson

Starting age: 15

Summary:

Gisela misses the days when her father was alive. The days when she experienced love, laughter, and family. Now all she experiences is her stepmother’s cruel tongue and hard work.

Valten’s parents want him to get married. Thing is, he haCaptive Maidensn’t come across a girl who has caught his eye…until now.

Romance begins to bloom, but will it be squashed under a nefarious scheme plotted by Gisela’s stepmother and a sworn enemy of Valten’s? If, and only if Gisela and Valten are able to escape the danger surrounding them will they discover the future God has planned.

Pros:

Gisela resists revenge on her stepmother, Valten fights for Gisela’s honor, faiths in God are strengthened, and new friendships are forged.

Cons:

Gisela and Valten are locked in a room together (nothing improper happens).

Enjoyable rating:

5 out of 5

Musings:

old bookold bookold bookold bookold book

My thoughts:

There is no impropriety and no foul language. The Captive Maiden sweeps you up into a time with dukes, knights, fair maidens, and chivalry. This book is a marvelous retelling of a popular fairy tale, mixed with faith in God.

For any teen girls wanting a sweet, clean, captivating,romance, I highly recommend this book.

 

“Almost you persuade me. But Valten and I must end our fight now, once and for all. I will take him to my castle in Bruchen, and there we shall have our final duel.”

 

 

Cloak of the Light

Book title: Cloak of the Light (book 1 in the War of the Realms series)

Author: Chuck Black

Starting age:  13

Summary:

Drew Carter has no need for God. Why should he when God took away his father whom Drew loved dearly?

Cloak of the Light When a horrific accident occurs, Drew finds his world changed dramatically when he sees what no one else can. Invaders. What stymies Drew is that some are good, some bad; and they are at war.

What Drew doesn’t know is that he is watching a war for the world. A war that might just help lead him in the direction of the God that he scoffs.

Pros:

Sticking with it, having faith in God even in a tough time, defending the underdog, doing the right thing, and not giving into pressure (in this case it’s drinking), are all quality ideas embedded in this book.

Cons:

A few of Drew’s comrades get drunk.

Enjoyable Rating:

5 out of 5

Musings (see my tab How I Rate the Books):

old book old book old book old book old book

My thoughts: 

Cloak of the Light is a captivating well-written book that grabs your attention, twists your heartstrings, and gives a glance into what spiritual warfare could look like, and by far one of my favorites. I’ve had this book for two years, and have probably read it eight times. After you’re done reading it for the first time, you’ll immediately go to the front and start over. It’s that good.

If you’re looking for a book that  will challenge your faith and give you hours of enjoyable reading, I would highly recommend Cloak of the Light.

The light invader made one quick slice that found its mark deep in an opponent’s chest, then turned, dodged two rounds, and used the brick wall to launch himself at the dark invader attacking from above.

About me

I’m a homeschooled Christian teen with a voracious appetite for books. The problem is, there aren’t many books out there for those of us who don’t enjoy reading reading books  with immoral practices, vile language, and indecent topics in them.

So I decided to go on a hunt for books that I would be able to read with Jesus looking over my shoulder-books I wouldn’t be ashamed to read in His presence, for as Paul says in his letter to the Philippians “Whatever is true, whatever is honorable, whatever is just, whatever is pure, whatever is lovely, whatever is commendable, if there is any excellence, if there is anything worthy of praise, think about these things. (Philippians 4:8). I can say with certainty that 98% of the teen books I have seen do not pass the test that Paul has laid down for us.

When I was twelve, I was ready to move on from the children’s section, so I decided to try out the YA area in the library.  The YA section quickly became known as “The Dark Side” in my family, and for a good reason: there is next to no “edible” material in the teen section that won’t give me reader’s indigestion.

But have no fear…

Since then, I have discovered many wonderful Christian authors that write books either for teens in particular or that are acceptable for teen reading; I will be reviewing those and many more on this blog.